The Custom Design Process: Katie & Adam

This is the fourth installment in my series, The Custom Design Process, where I walk through the steps I've gone through with a particular client to come to their final custom designed invitation. I find it so fascinating, once a design is finished and the invitations have been printed and mailed, to go back in my files and look at the very first draft for my client. Because most of my proofing process is digital, I have files saved in my email and on my computer from every single step of the way. Some designs are very close at the first draft, and the final design isn't too far removed, but others start out SO far from how they finish. If you've ever wondered what the process can be like, here you go! Katie & Adam

1. Inquiry- The first step in the process is for the client to reach out and start the conversation about what s/he is looking for in an invitation. Sometimes this includes sharing Pinterest inspiration, color choices, and general feel. And sometimes, it's a big fat "I have NO idea."

Katie had ideas. Lots of them! She was a bride on a mission, and provided me with lots of direction right from the get go. It was so easy to hone in on her style--she sent me links to invitations she was leaning towards, which made me see right away that she wanted something more traditional with a little creative flair. "Nothing boring" is what she said. Their colors would be navy, light green, light blue, and light pink, and their reception was at Alden Castle, a Longwood Events venue in Brookline, MA. She picked out a design from my own collection that was closest to what she wanted, and they had already done a Save the Date that she wanted to match, at least somewhat, in style:

 
 

2. First Looks - The next step is for me to start drafting up some samples based on the ideas the couple provided. I generally provide three First Looks.

Katie wanted to play with the iconic chandeliers of Adlen Castle, since they had used an image of a chandelier on their Save the Date. But she also said they might like to use some kind of lace image. The examples she sent me all had a sort of lacy border around them, so I tried to incorporate that in one of the First Looks. The third option used a fine paper with gold and tiny glitter accents in a layered style:

3. Honing in - The next step is for me to create another set of proofs based on elements from the First Looks that the client wants to see more of -- which fonts they like, which layout is best, and which color combination they prefer.

Not surprisingly, they went with the Chandelier design. The image was actually pulled from a photograph from inside Alden Castle, so the chandelier was a perfect match to their venue. Next up was the 2015 Battle of the Fonts. If am slightly font-obsessed, Katie Reynolds was certifiably font-crazy. (I can say that because she knows it's true, and she knows I love her for it!). They didn't love the formal, swirly look of the fonts on the first draft, so I sent over some script options and then some new versions based on their choices. We also swapped out the border to a navy:

When I say Katie was font-crazy, I say it lovingly, but I also mean it. I think she had dreams nightmares about fonts. I won't let the public in on how many emails really went back and forth on the tiniest of font details, but the short story is that we settled on the font from Option Two, with the ampersand from Option Three, with lots of glyph alterations. We also added back in the green border in addition to the blue, and I lightened up the chandelier to make it feel a little more delicate:

 
Reynolds_Fitz Chandelier_INVITE
Reynolds_Fitz Chandelier_INVITE
 

3A. The Inserts:Once the design is in place for the main invitation, I move on to the insert cards.

In this case we needed a Reception/Details card and an RSVP, which I actually started before the invitation fonts were settled on. Katie had been very specific about wanting one of the cards to be light lettering on a dark background:

 

After seeing these first drafts, Katie asked if we could bring in the chandelier, and had the idea to maybe incorporate an image of Alden Castle. I switched up the page orientation, and did a rendering of the castle. Once we sorted out the fonts, those were swapped out as well:

4. The Details - Putting the finishing touches on a design is maybe my favorite part. This is where I hand my design over, so to speak, to the couple, and let them perfect all the details to their taste and their event.

Once the three main pieces were put together, we started playing with different ways to present the whole package. Katie wanted a sash with some kind of square seal with either their names or a monogram, and we added in a green RSVP envelope to add another layer of color. The whole piece was presented in a white envelope with navy liner, with printed addresses on everything. I LOVE how this all came together!

5. The Accessories - For many of my clients, the invitation is just the beginning. As the wedding nears, there are other items that get added to the list -- welcome cards, menus, programs, favor tags, you name it. All these printed items can (and should, if you ask me!) be coordinated with your invitations. And the good news is, once the invitations have been finished, all the hard work and decision making has been done. The other pieces come together much more quickly because the design theme is already in place!

 
 

Katie and Adam decided to carry the design through their Rehearsal Dinner Invitation, which was to be held at the Hampshire House, also in Boston. I employed the same techniques I used to manipulate the image of Alden Castle, and switched up the colors to make it feel different but related:

They also added ceremony programs with coordinating fonts and colors:

Photo: The Feds Weddings
Photo: The Feds Weddings

And menus that poked out of the napkins and incorporated the chandeliers that hung over the tables:

Photo: The Feds Weddings
Photo: The Feds Weddings

This invitation, along with many others, is available on my Etsy shop!

Stay tuned for more Custom Design Process posts!

The Custom Design Process: Kira & Willem

This is the second in my new series, The Custom Design Process, where I walk through the steps I've gone through with a particular client to come to their final custom designed invitation. I find it so fascinating, once a design is finished and the invitations have been printed and mailed, to go back in my files and look at the very first draft for my client. Because most of my proofing process is digital, I have files saved in my email and on my computer from every single step of the way. Some designs are very close at the first draft, and the final design isn't too far removed, but others start out SO far from how they finish. If you've ever wondered what the process can be like, here you go! Kira & Willem

1. Inquiry- The first step in the process is for the client to reach out and start the conversation about what s/he is looking for in an invitation. Sometimes this includes sharing Pinterest inspiration, color choices, and general feel. And sometimes, it's a big fat "I have NO idea."

I've known Kira for most of my life, but we only see each other for a week each year, and we spend most of our time in swimsuits and bare feet. While I feel a great connection to Kira and her family (our mothers are like sisters) I wasn't sure what kind of style she'd go with for her wedding. So, I asked all the normal questions, and while she gave me a little guidance, the general response was "Work your magic!". She said they were having a backyard wedding, with greys and purples and a casual, international feel.

2. First Looks - The next step is for me to start drafting up some samples based on the ideas the couple provided. I generally provide three First Looks.

I tried to hone in on the backyard feel. Fresh flowers, strings of lights, etc. The first two designs were to be a layered flat card:

GaNun_Kira Floral Mounted GaNun_Kira Lights Mounted

The third design played with the idea of travel a little more, and I found this perfect quote that totally fit Kira and Will (and the fact that they had traveled together all over the world and were getting married at her parents' home!)

GaNun_Folder Enclosure Outside

GaNun_Folder Enclosure

3. Honing in - The next step is for me to create another set of proofs based on elements from the First Looks that the client wants to see more of -- which fonts they like, which layout is best, and which color combination they prefer.

Not surprisingly, Kira, Will and their parents all loved the map design. Kira wanted to try out using the fonts from the Light String invitation, and she wanted to see a little more purple. In general, she wanted a more casual, whimsical look. We weren't sure about the grey, but I said I'd send them a few physical samples, and maybe we'd lighten it up with the envelope. In round two, I brought back the lanterns for a minute just to see if they liked that theme in the map enclosure:

GaNun_Folder Enclosure Lights GaNun_Folder Enclosure Swirl

4. The Details - Putting the finishing touches on a design is maybe my favorite part. This is where I hand my design over, so to speak, to the couple, and let them perfect all the details to their taste and their event.

They ended up sticking with the heart design, and we switched to a vertical layered card for the RSVP to bring in some more purple. The online RSVP added convenience and dropped the cost a little, and I set them up with their own URL. The sash on the front was switched up for a purple band with a little of the map peaking out as a second layer. Fun fact: I was very careful to make the heart cut-out (yes, that was cut out of every single invitation!) over Scotland, where Kira's entire family went on vacation recently, and where Kira and Will share many fond memories.

_MG_2063 _MG_2066 _MG_2067_MG_2070

5. The Accessories - For many of my clients, the invitation is just the beginning. As the wedding nears, there are other items that get added to the list -- welcome cards, menus, programs, favor tags, you name it. All these printed items can (and should, if you ask me!) be coordinated with your invitations. And the good news is, once the invitations have been finished, all the hard work and decision making has been done. The other pieces come together much more quickly because the design theme is already in place!

Turns out, Kira and Will have a plethora of talented friends, and Kira's pretty crafty herself. I was lucky enough to attend this wedding myself, and it was gorgeous, super comfortable and homey, and so personal. They carried the travel theme throughout the whole backyard, with a world map seating chart, and tables named after some of their favorite places in the world. We sat in London!

886016_10100196220698979_2749101941677227074_oIMG_3774

One of Kira's friends drew portraits of the bride and groom and the whole bridal party. Definitely one of the coolest ceremony programs I've ever seen!

11061275_10100196212914579_3349086340278405520_oPhoto Credit: Melissa Mullins11713723_10100196214676049_6454582835795878915_oPhoto Credit: Melissa MullinsPhoto Credit: Melissa MullinsPhoto Credit: Melissa Mullins11700687_10100196221517339_7951828998221277186_oPhoto Credit: Melissa MullinsWill's Dad gave a toast at the wedding, and pulled out the invitation, bringing the whole experience full circle for everyone there. "Life brings you to unexpected places, Love brings you home." I got chills (and teary-eyed) and was reminded for the thousandth time why I love what I do!

This invitation, along with many others, is available on my Etsy shop!

Stay tuned for more Custom Design Process posts!

Wedding Photography by Melissa Mullins